The​ ​Vault:​
​Jeannette​
​​Klute

Oct. 31 –
Dec. 3,
2017

Jeannette Klute, Fringed Polygala (Polygala paucifolia), from "Woodland Portraits," ca 1950. Eli and Edythe Broad Art Museum, Michigan State University, Gift of Jim Agah and Wendy Sohorec Agah (BA School of Communications 1989).

This work was selected by Katharyn Hogle (class of 2017), who explains: “I have recently become more interested in photography, and while I found many lovely photos in the collection database, none struck me quite like this one by Jeannette Klute. Each piece from her series Woodland Portraits depicts a flower with uniquely saturated color and limited image clarity around the focal point: a specific plant, creating the feeling of viewing a passage into a dream. With Fringed Polygala, I find myself stepping into the backwoods of my grandma’s farm; I dream of the serenity, the safe haven for all creatures, the sound of the wind.

I also found this artist and work to be significant because through Klute’s practice, she influenced both the world of photographic dye transfer processing—changing color photography for the better—as well as opened many doors for women to enter the field of photography. I believe her works need to be shown and remembered not only because of their serene beauty but in recognition of her many accomplishments.”

The​ ​Vault

The Vault, which also houses some of the works from our permanent collection, is dedicated to featuring and displaying works chosen by MSU students who work at the museum. Each month, one of our student gallery guides selects a piece from our collection and writes a short text explaining why they chose it and believe it should be displayed. By providing our gallery guides with an opportunity to participate in the curatorial process of selection and display, we aim to open a dialogue with the student community while simultaneously sharing with the public works from the collection that would otherwise remain in storage.