The​ ​Vault:​
Juana
Alicia

Oct. 3 –
Oct. 29,
2017

Juana​ ​Alicia,​ ​​Auto​ ​Vision​,​ ​from​ ​the​ ​portfolio 10​ ​x​ ​10:​ ​Ten​ ​Women/Ten​ ​Prints​,​ ​1995.​ ​Eli and​ ​Edythe​ ​Broad​ ​Art​ ​Museum,​ ​Michigan State​ ​University,​ ​Purchase,​ ​funded​ ​by​ ​the Office​ ​of​ ​the​ ​Vice​ ​President​ ​for​ ​Research​ ​and Graduate​ ​Studies.

This​ ​work​ ​was​ ​selected​ ​by​ ​Ann​ ​Durbin​ ​(class​ ​of​ ​2019),​ ​who​ ​explains:​ ​“I​ ​was​ ​drawn​ ​to​ ​this​ ​piece for​ ​the​ ​underlying​ ​activist​ ​intentions​ ​that​ ​swirl​ ​beneath​ ​the​ ​surface​ ​of​ ​this​ ​evocative​ ​print.​ ​The piece​ ​is​ ​both​ ​a​ ​silent​ ​protest​ ​and​ ​tribute​ ​to​ ​women.​ ​Juana​ ​Alicia​ ​has​ ​dedicated​ ​her​ ​life​ ​to​ ​using her​ ​art​ ​as​ ​a​ ​form​ ​of​ ​activism,​ ​taking​ ​a​ ​stance​ ​for​ ​social​ ​justice—one​ ​artistic​ ​gesture​ ​at​ ​a​ ​time.

I​ ​was​ ​not​ ​familiar​ ​with​ ​Juana​ ​Alicia’s​ ​work​ ​before​ ​stumbling​ ​upon​ ​this​ ​piece​ ​in​ ​the​ ​collection.​ ​The striking​ ​colors​ ​seem​ ​to​ ​have​ ​a​ ​voice​ ​of​ ​their​ ​own.​ ​They​ ​speak​ ​to​ ​the​ ​struggles​ ​of​ ​women​ ​today, who​ ​find​ ​themselves​ ​assuming​ ​the​ ​form​ ​of​ ​a​ ​crumbling​ ​base​ ​relied​ ​upon​ ​to​ ​support​ ​a​ ​weight​ ​far greater​ ​than​ ​one​ ​can​ ​manage.​ ​Although​ ​we​ ​have​ ​made​ ​significant​ ​progress​ ​as​ ​a​ ​society towards​ ​equal​ ​rights,​ ​this​ ​piece​ ​speaks​ ​to​ ​how​ ​double​ ​standards​ ​between​ ​men​ ​and​ ​women continually​ ​resurface,​ ​and​ ​the​ ​unrealistic​ ​expectations​ ​placed​ ​on​ ​women​ ​in​ ​terms​ ​of​ ​their behavior,​ ​responsibility,​ ​and​ ​appearance.”

The​​ ​​Vault

The​​ ​​Vault,​​ ​​which​​ ​​also​​ ​​houses​​ ​​some​​ ​​of​​ ​​the​​ ​​works​​ ​​from​​ ​​our​​ ​​permanent​​ ​​collection,​​ ​​is​​ ​​dedicated​​ ​​to featuring​​ ​​and​​ ​​displaying​​ ​​works​​ ​​chosen​​ ​​by​​ ​​MSU​​ ​​students​​ ​​who​​ ​​work​​ ​​at​​ ​​the​​ ​​museum.​​ ​​Each​​ ​​month, one​​ ​​of​​ ​​our​​ ​​student​​ ​​gallery​​ ​​guides​​ ​​selects​​ ​​a​​ ​​piece​​ ​​from​​ ​​our​​ ​​collection​​ ​​and​​ ​​writes​​ ​​a​​ ​​short​​ ​​text explaining​​ ​​why​​ ​​they​​ ​​chose​​ ​​it​​ ​​and​​ ​​believe​​ ​​it​​ ​​should​​ ​​be​​ ​​displayed.​​ ​​By​​ ​​providing​​ ​​our​​ ​​gallery​​ ​​guides with​​ ​​an​​ ​​opportunity​​ ​​to​​ ​​participate​​ ​​in​​ ​​the​​ ​​curatorial​​ ​​process​​ ​​of​​ ​​selection​​ ​​and​​ ​​display,​​ ​​we​​ ​​aim​​ ​​to open​​ ​​a​​ ​​dialogue​​ ​​with​​ ​​the​​ ​​student​​ ​​community​​ ​​while​​ ​​simultaneously​​ ​​sharing​​ ​​with​​ ​​the​​ ​​public​​ ​​works from​​ ​​the​​ ​​collection​​ ​​that​​ ​​would​​ ​​otherwise​​ ​​remain​​ ​​in​​ ​​storage.