Andrew​ ​Norman​ ​Wilson:​
Mosquito​ ​Computer

Dec. 16 –
Feb. 11,
2018

Andrew​ ​Norman​ ​Wilson,​ ​​Mosquito​ ​Computer​, 2017.​ ​Courtesy​ ​the​ ​artist.

For​ ​this​ ​iteration​ ​of​ ​Andrew​ ​Norman​ ​Wilson’s​ ​​Mosquito​ ​Computer​,​ ​the​ ​museum​ ​architecture created​ ​by​ ​Zaha​ ​Hadid​ ​becomes​ ​the​ ​work’s​ ​chassis.​ ​Earlier​ ​exhibitions​ ​of​ ​the​ ​work​ ​were contained​ ​within​ ​a​ ​customized​ ​computer​ ​case.​ ​The​ ​architecture​ ​and​ ​the​ ​computer​ ​then​ ​become one​ ​and​ ​the​ ​same,​ ​and​ ​even​ ​this​ ​wall​ ​text​ ​transforms​ ​into​ ​a​ ​README​ ​file.​ ​Inside​ ​the​ ​“computer” are​ ​two​ ​hard​ ​drive​ ​enclosures,​ ​one​ ​filled​ ​with​ ​a​ ​pond​ ​for​ ​larvae​ ​to​ ​grow,​ ​the​ ​other​ ​with​ ​tree​ ​resin that​ ​serves​ ​as​ ​both​ ​a​ ​food​ ​supply​ ​and​ ​a​ ​preservation​ ​medium​ ​for​ ​dead​ ​mosquitoes.​ ​An​ ​excerpt of​ ​the​ ​film​ ​​Batman​ ​v.​ ​Superman:​ ​Dawn​ ​of​ ​Justice​​ ​(2016)​ ​is​ ​projected​ ​within​ ​the​ ​space​ ​as​ ​visual stimulus​ ​for​ ​the​ ​mosquitoes,​ ​also​ ​acknowledging​ ​the​ ​museum’s​ ​role​ ​as​ ​a​ ​set​ ​in​ ​the​ ​film.​ ​Over the​ ​course​ ​of​ ​the​ ​exhibition,​ ​the​ ​female​ ​mosquitoes​ ​are​ ​fed​ ​blood​ ​meals​ ​sourced​ ​from​ ​the artist’s​ ​veins​ ​to​ ​afford​ ​them​ ​the​ ​protein​ ​they​ ​need​ ​to​ ​make​ ​their​ ​eggs.​ ​These​ ​blood​ ​meals​ ​also allow​ ​the​ ​artist​ ​to​ ​store​ ​his​ ​genetic​ ​information​ ​temporarily​ ​in​ ​the​ ​mosquitoes’​ ​bodies,​ ​and​ ​then permanently​ ​in​ ​the​ ​tree​ ​resin​ ​once​ ​it​ ​becomes​ ​amber.​ ​As​ ​the​ ​artist​ ​points​ ​out,​ ​“according​ ​to​ ​the narrative​ ​of​ ​​Jurassic​ ​Park​​ ​(1993),​ ​this​ ​could​ ​allow​ ​for​ ​clones​ ​to​ ​be​ ​produced​ ​in​ ​the​ ​future.”

Andrew​ ​Norman​ ​Wilson:​ ​Mosquito​ ​Computer​​ ​is​ ​organized​ ​by​ ​the​ ​Eli​ ​and​ ​Edythe​ ​Broad​ ​Art Museum​ ​at​ ​Michigan​ ​State​ ​University​ ​and​ ​curated​ ​by​ ​Steven​ ​L.​ ​Bridges,​ ​Associate​ ​Curator. Support​ ​for​ ​this​ ​exhibition​ ​is​ ​provided​ ​by​ ​the​ ​Alan​ ​and​ ​Rebecca​ ​Ross​ ​endowed​ ​exhibition​ ​fund.